Tag Archives: education

Introducing the Sexuality Speaker Series

I am very excited to be collaborating with Michael Aaron on another groundbreaking project in service of alternative sexuality communities!  The inaugural 2016-2017 season will tackle issues including: harm reduction for compulsive sexual behavior; the ameliorating aspects of pain within a BDSM context; therapeutic use of psychedelics such as ibogaine in the treatment of sexual trauma; queer masculinities; men having sex with men (MSM); and evolving sexuality during gender transition. More info on SSS and the 2nd annual AltSex NYC Conference in the update below!

 

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Hello friends, colleagues, and community!

The creators of the AltSex NYC Conference are pleased to introduce the Sexuality Speakers Series (SSS), a New York City arena for clinical and educational discussion on cutting-edge sexuality topics rarely discussed elsewhere and that few others are willing to tackle. Each monthly 90-minute talk has been approved by New York State Education Department’s State Board for Social Work and AASECT for 1.5 continuing education credits. The 2016-2017 season begins on September 20, 2016, and tickets for the entire season are on sale now. Seating is very limited and likely to sell out, so click here to register sooner than later for the talks you absolutely don’t want to miss. 

Also, save the date for the 2nd annual AltSex NYC Conference on Friday, April 28, 2017, and stay tuned for a call for proposals beginning on July 1 with a deadline of September 16, 2016! 

Cheers,

Michael Aaron, PhD and Dulcinea Pitagora, MA, LMSW

SexualitySpeakerSeries.org
AltSexNYCconference.org

NOTE: The content of this blog is owned by Dulcinea Pitagora. See Terms and Conditions for republishing restrictions/allowances.

1st Annual AltSex NYC Conference 2016—10 Days Left for Regular Registration

Hello Friends, Colleagues, and Community!

I couldn’t be more excited to be involved in organizing and producing the 1st Annual AltSex NYC Conference on April 22, 2016 alongside Dr. Michael Aaron. Please see the stellar line up of speakers below, and note that the best time to buy tickets is now, before regular registration ends and prices go up on April 1.

Please also note that the conference has officially been approved by New York State for 6.5 social work continuing education credits, and also by AASECT for 6.5 continuing education credits.

If you have obligations that will keep you from attending the conference in person, you can attend remotely via live streaming, which is also eligible for continuing education credits.

Cheers,

Dulcinea

1st Annual AltSex NYC Conference

Friday, April 22, 2016
8:15am – 5:15pm

Midtown Manhattan
CEs available*

Introducing the 1st Annual AltSex NYC Conference—where clinicians, academics, and alt lifestyle community members will come together for a full day of sex-positive, alternative lifestyle affirmative, cutting edge research-based,  and current practice-informed seminars and discussions presented by a stellar collection of New York City educators and mental health providers.   

LIVE STREAMING (WITH CE’S) IS AVAILABLE FOR REMOTE ATTENDEES! 

8:15AM — Welcome Address

8:30AM — Keynote Address by Margaret Nichols, PhD
“Kink is Good: BDSM in the Context of New Models of Sex and Gender Variance”

10:05AM — Zhana Vrangalova, PhD
“Myths and Realities of Consensual Non-Monogamy”

11:05AM — Dulcinea Pitagora, MA, LMSW and Michael Aaron, PhD
“The Kink-Poly Confluence: Community Intersections and Clinical Approaches”

12:05PM — Lunch Break

1:20PM — Michael Aaron, PhD
“Facing Your Shadow: The Healing Potential of Psychological Edge Play”

2:20PM — Rosalyn Dischiavo, EdD, CSES
“Metamorphosis: Braving Transitions in Polyamorous Relationships”

3:30PM — David Ortmann, LCSW
“Age Play: Eros, Practicality, and Walking the Edge”

4:30PM — Panel Discussion & Final Words (optional)

produced by
Michael Aaron, PhD and Dulcinea Pitagora, MA, LMSW

*PROGRAM APPROVED: The AltSexNYC Conference has been approved by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Social Work as a continuing education provider (# 0314) for licensed social workers. 

*PROGRAM APPROVED:  This program meets the requirements of the American Association of Sexuality Educators, Counselors and Therapists (AASECT) and is approved for 6.5 AASECT CE Credits. These CE Credits may be applied toward AASECT certification and renewal of certification.

A portion of the AltSex NYC Conference proceeds will be donated to the Community-Academic Consortium for Research on Alternative Sexualities (CARAS) in appreciation of their continued dedication to supporting and promoting excellence in the study of alternative sexualities. 

For more information, visit AltSexNYCconference.org.

Midtown Manhattan

New York, NY
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NOTE: The content of this blog is owned by Dulcinea Pitagora. See Terms and Conditions for republishing restrictions/allowances.

Early Registration Opens for the 1st Annual AltSex NYC Conference!

EARLY REGISTRATION IS OPEN! REMOTE STREAMING IS AVAILABLE!

AltSex NYC Conference

Friday, April 22, 2016
8:15am – 5:15pm

Midtown Manhattan
CEs available*

Introducing the 1st Annual AltSex NYC Conference—where clinicians, academics, and alt lifestyle community members will come together for a full day of sex-positive, alternative lifestyle affirmative, cutting edge research-based,  and current practice-informed seminars and discussions presented by a stellar collection of New York City educators and mental health providers.

EARLY REGISTRATION INCLUDES DISCOUNTED TICKETS
FOR STUDENTS, PROFESSIONALS, AND COMMUNITY MEMBERS.
LIVE STREAMING IS ALSO AVAILABLE FOR REMOTE ATTENDEES!

Speakers and Session Schedule:

8:15AM — Welcome Address

8:30AM — Keynote Address by Margaret Nichols, PhD
“Kink is Good: BDSM in the Context of New Models of Sex and Gender Variance”

10:05AM — Zhana Vrangalova, PhD
“Myths and Realities of Consensual Non-Monogamy”

11:05AM — Dulcinea Pitagora, MA, LMSW and Michael Aaron, PhD
“The Kink-Poly Confluence: Community Intersections and Clinical Approaches”

12:05PM — Lunch Break

1:20PM — Michael Aaron, PhD
“Facing Your Shadow: The Healing Potential of Psychological Edge Play” 

2:20PM — Rosalyn Dischiavo, PhD
“Metamorphosis: Braving Transitions in Polyamorous Relationships” 

3:30PM — David Ortmann, LCSW
“Age Play: Eros, Practicality, and Walking the Edge”

4:30PM — Panel Discussion & Final Words (optional)

 

produced by
Michael Aaron, PhD and Dulcinea Pitagora, MA, LMSW

A portion of the AltSex NYC Conference proceeds will be donated to the Community-Academic Consortium for Research on Alternative Sexualities (CARAS) in appreciation of their continued dedication to supporting and promoting excellence in the study of alternative sexualities.

*The AltSexNYC Conference is currently being reviewed by AASECT as an approved provider of continuing education for certified sex therapists, and the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers.

For more information or to register for the conference, visit AltSexNYCconference.org.

NOTE: The content of this blog is owned by Dulcinea Pitagora. See Terms and Conditions for republishing restrictions/allowances.

Resources for Sexuality and Gender Warriors

Disclosure: I have a morning coffee and reading ritual, and this morning I realized I hadn’t yet followed Dr. Meg John Barker’s blog Rewriting the Rules—now corrected!  Dr. Barker’s latest blog post Beyond the Binary is inspiring in its eloquence and clarity around the important influence that “sexuality and gender warriors” have on questioning “static thinking about sexuality.” Give it a read! I was also inspired to add Dr. Barker’s book Rewriting the Rules to my library:

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Rewriting the Rules is a friendly guide through the complicated—and often contradictory—
rules of love: the advice that is given about attraction and sex,
monogamy and conflict, gender and commitment.”

Dr. Barker’s blog also offers a multitude of resources on sexuality and gender diversity. One in particular that I wanted to share is the link to Clarisse Thorn’s BDSM Resources, which led to another blog subscription as well as a few new additions to my library, including:

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A Parent’s Guide to Alternative Sexualities: “There’s More!”

by Amy Marsh

“A progressive, introductory handbook for parents who have teenagers and young adults
who are expressing an interest in alternative sexualities such as BDSM and polyamory.
Practical, supportive information written by a clinical sexologist.”

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The S&M Feminist: Best of Clarisse Thorn

“Clarisse Thorn’s writing has appeared across the Internet in places like
The Guardian, AlterNet, Feministe, Jezebel, Time Out, The Rumpus, Ms., and
The Good Men Project. This is a selection of her best articles, all in one place!”

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Playing Well with Others

Playing Well with Others:
Your Field Guide to Discovering, Navigating and Exploring
the Kink, Leather, and BDSM Communities

by Lee Harrington

“While there are plenty of other books out there that explain how to give a spanking
or tie a half-hitch, Playing Well with Others is the first book that explains kink *culture*—the munches,
parties, leather bars, conferences, workshops, fetish nights, exploratoriums and all the other gatherings
of kinksters that turn BDSM and leather from a bedroom predeliction to a lifestyle and a community.”

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Playing on the Edge

Playing on the Edge: Sadomasochism, Risk, and Intimacy

by Staci Newmahr

“In this pathbreaking book, ethnographer Staci Newmahr delves into the social space of a
public, pansexual SM community to understand sadomasochism from the inside out.
Based on four years of in-depth and immersive participant observation, she juxtaposes
her experiences in the field with the life stories of community members, providing a richly detailed
portrait of SM as a social space in which experiences of “violence” intersect with experiences of the erotic.”

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Thorne’s complete list is well worth checking out, and goes beyond books to include films, other online resources, and information about how to find in person events near you. If you have favorite resources you feel like sharing, please post them in the comments below!

NOTE: The content of this blog is owned by Dulcinea Pitagora. See Terms and Conditions for republishing restrictions/allowances.

Cross-post: Thinking Globally about Sex and Gender

A couple of years ago I discovered a document called the Yogyakarta Principles on the Application of International Human Rights Law in relation to Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity, created in 2006 in Yogyakarta, Indonesia by the International Commission of Jurists and the International Service for Human Rights, on behalf of a coalition of human rights organizations in reaction to egregious international human rights violations pertaining to individuals marginalized for their sexual orientation and/or gender identifications.

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The introduction to the Yogyakarta Principles begins with…

“All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. all human rights are universal, interdependent, indivisible and interrelated. sexual orientation1) and gender identity2) are integral to every person’s dignity and humanity and must not be the basis for discrimination or abuse” (p. 6).

…and ends with…

“The Yogyakarta Principles affirm binding international legal standards with which all states must comply. they promise a different future where all people born free and equal in dignity and rights can fulfill that precious birthright” (p. 7).

I’m an advocate for every clinician and educator’s (and every human, really) reading this document in its entirety, which is why I decided to post this on the ManhattanAlternative.com blog, and is why I’m cross-posting it here as well. Though the abridged principles listed as follows can be interpreted differently depending on context and experience, thinking critically about them as they stand here is a useful exercise in itself:

  1. The right to the universal enjoyment of human rights.
  2. The rights to equality and non-discrimination.
  3. The right to recognition before the law.
  4. The right to life.
  5. The right to security of the person.
  6. The right to privacy.
  7. The right to freedom of arbitrary deprivation of liberty.
  8. The right to a fair trial.
  9. The right to treatment with humanity while in detention.
  10. The right to freedom from torture and cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.
  11. The right to protection from all forms of exploitation, sale and trafficking of human beings.
  12. The right to work.
  13. The right to social security and to other social protection measures.
  14. The right to an adequate standard of living.
  15. The right to adequate housing.
  16. The right to education.
  17. The right to the highest attainable standard of health.
  18. Protection from medical abuses.
  19. The right to freedom of opinion and expression.
  20. The right to freedom of peaceful assembly and association.
  21. The right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion.
  22. The right to freedom of movement.
  23. The right to seek asylum.
  24. The right to found a family.
  25. The right to participate in public life.
  26. The right to participate in cultural life.
  27. The right to promote human rights.
  28. The right to effective remedies and redress.
  29. Accountability.

Some interesting questions to ponder:

Which of the above principles most affect you on a regular basis?

Which have you fought for in terms of your personal experience?

Which might you have taken for granted?

NOTE: The content of this blog is owned by Dulcinea Pitagora. See Terms and Conditions for republishing restrictions/allowances.

The (In)visibility of Gender Diversity in Graduate Level Education

While the abstract below refers to the lack of education on gender diversity in graduate level psychology programs and to the pathologization of gender diversity in related literature, it’s clear that the reification of heteronormative gender roles is also rampant in the field of social work (Hicks, 2014). As someone who holds master’s degrees in both psychology and social work, I experienced this phenomenon first hand twice, and as someone whose practice provides support for underserved individuals in the trans* community, I’ve taken it upon myself to correct this gap in my education. My efforts have also been motivated by identifying as non-binary/gender fluid, though I say this knowing that I benefit from the privilege that goes along with being presumed to be cis female in most circles. However, it is not solely for personal and professional reasons that I am posting the abstract to this article. Clinicians, educators, and other service providers have a responsibility to understand gender and sexual diversity—it is crucial not only to avoid further stigmatizing underserved populations, but this is the most direct route towards recognizing the diversity that exists (often invisibly) in every individual. Knowledge is powerful, and I believe that instilling a heightened awareness of diversity in future psychologists and social workers has the power to relieve constraints against freedom of expression for all individuals, and create a more tolerant and accepting society overall.

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Peering into Gaps in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders:
Student Perspectives on Gender and Informing Education
by Jessica Joseph, Dulcinea Pitagora, Adrian Tworecke, and Kailey Roberts (2013)
The Society for International Education Journal:
Engaging with Difference, Gender and Sexuality in Education, 7
(1), 104-127

Abstract: At the intersection of psychology and critical theories, graduate students in psychology are uniquely situated to analyze the pedagogical assumptions and practices that shape constructions of gender normativity in the field. Writing from the perspective of current students, we examine how the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition Text-Revision’s (DSM-IV-TR) work group members represent gender in their own publications. In line with previous criticisms, we suggest that many of the work group members uphold traditional binary systems; perpetuate statistical reinforcement and social loops; and pathologize (or deem developmentally lagging) gender diverse behavior. We question whether the DSM-IV-TR has been revised by diverse voices and make recommendations on how graduate-level curricula might broaden its pedagogy to include more fluid and inclusive concepts of gender expression.

A full-text PDF of the journal issue this article was published in can be downloaded here; the article begins on page 104.

While the Hicks article I mentioned above reviews “various theorizations of gender” (e.g., poststructural and postmodern feminism, queer and trans theory, material and structural, ethnomethodological, performative, and discursive) “to highlight ways in which social work may be limited in the versions that it prioritizes” (p. 13), it is exceedingly valuable to fields and schools of thought reaching far beyond the scope of social work. I highly recommend reading it! Here’s the citation:

Hicks, S. (2014). Social work and gender: An argument for practical accounts. Qualitative Social Work, 0(00), 1-17.

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NOTE: The content of this blog is owned by Dulcinea Pitagora. See Terms and Conditions for republishing restrictions/allowances.