Tag Archives: community

Introducing the Sexuality Speaker Series

I am very excited to be collaborating with Michael Aaron on another groundbreaking project in service of alternative sexuality communities!  The inaugural 2016-2017 season will tackle issues including: harm reduction for compulsive sexual behavior; the ameliorating aspects of pain within a BDSM context; therapeutic use of psychedelics such as ibogaine in the treatment of sexual trauma; queer masculinities; men having sex with men (MSM); and evolving sexuality during gender transition. More info on SSS and the 2nd annual AltSex NYC Conference in the update below!

 

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Hello friends, colleagues, and community!

The creators of the AltSex NYC Conference are pleased to introduce the Sexuality Speakers Series (SSS), a New York City arena for clinical and educational discussion on cutting-edge sexuality topics rarely discussed elsewhere and that few others are willing to tackle. Each monthly 90-minute talk has been approved by New York State Education Department’s State Board for Social Work and AASECT for 1.5 continuing education credits. The 2016-2017 season begins on September 20, 2016, and tickets for the entire season are on sale now. Seating is very limited and likely to sell out, so click here to register sooner than later for the talks you absolutely don’t want to miss. 

Also, save the date for the 2nd annual AltSex NYC Conference on Friday, April 28, 2017, and stay tuned for a call for proposals beginning on July 1 with a deadline of September 16, 2016! 

Cheers,

Michael Aaron, PhD and Dulcinea Pitagora, MA, LMSW

SexualitySpeakerSeries.org
AltSexNYCconference.org

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1st Annual AltSex NYC Conference 2016—10 Days Left for Regular Registration

Hello Friends, Colleagues, and Community!

I couldn’t be more excited to be involved in organizing and producing the 1st Annual AltSex NYC Conference on April 22, 2016 alongside Dr. Michael Aaron. Please see the stellar line up of speakers below, and note that the best time to buy tickets is now, before regular registration ends and prices go up on April 1.

Please also note that the conference has officially been approved by New York State for 6.5 social work continuing education credits, and also by AASECT for 6.5 continuing education credits.

If you have obligations that will keep you from attending the conference in person, you can attend remotely via live streaming, which is also eligible for continuing education credits.

Cheers,

Dulcinea

1st Annual AltSex NYC Conference

Friday, April 22, 2016
8:15am – 5:15pm

Midtown Manhattan
CEs available*

Introducing the 1st Annual AltSex NYC Conference—where clinicians, academics, and alt lifestyle community members will come together for a full day of sex-positive, alternative lifestyle affirmative, cutting edge research-based,  and current practice-informed seminars and discussions presented by a stellar collection of New York City educators and mental health providers.   

LIVE STREAMING (WITH CE’S) IS AVAILABLE FOR REMOTE ATTENDEES! 

8:15AM — Welcome Address

8:30AM — Keynote Address by Margaret Nichols, PhD
“Kink is Good: BDSM in the Context of New Models of Sex and Gender Variance”

10:05AM — Zhana Vrangalova, PhD
“Myths and Realities of Consensual Non-Monogamy”

11:05AM — Dulcinea Pitagora, MA, LMSW and Michael Aaron, PhD
“The Kink-Poly Confluence: Community Intersections and Clinical Approaches”

12:05PM — Lunch Break

1:20PM — Michael Aaron, PhD
“Facing Your Shadow: The Healing Potential of Psychological Edge Play”

2:20PM — Rosalyn Dischiavo, EdD, CSES
“Metamorphosis: Braving Transitions in Polyamorous Relationships”

3:30PM — David Ortmann, LCSW
“Age Play: Eros, Practicality, and Walking the Edge”

4:30PM — Panel Discussion & Final Words (optional)

produced by
Michael Aaron, PhD and Dulcinea Pitagora, MA, LMSW

*PROGRAM APPROVED: The AltSexNYC Conference has been approved by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Social Work as a continuing education provider (# 0314) for licensed social workers. 

*PROGRAM APPROVED:  This program meets the requirements of the American Association of Sexuality Educators, Counselors and Therapists (AASECT) and is approved for 6.5 AASECT CE Credits. These CE Credits may be applied toward AASECT certification and renewal of certification.

A portion of the AltSex NYC Conference proceeds will be donated to the Community-Academic Consortium for Research on Alternative Sexualities (CARAS) in appreciation of their continued dedication to supporting and promoting excellence in the study of alternative sexualities. 

For more information, visit AltSexNYCconference.org.

Midtown Manhattan

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Early Registration Opens for the 1st Annual AltSex NYC Conference!

EARLY REGISTRATION IS OPEN! REMOTE STREAMING IS AVAILABLE!

AltSex NYC Conference

Friday, April 22, 2016
8:15am – 5:15pm

Midtown Manhattan
CEs available*

Introducing the 1st Annual AltSex NYC Conference—where clinicians, academics, and alt lifestyle community members will come together for a full day of sex-positive, alternative lifestyle affirmative, cutting edge research-based,  and current practice-informed seminars and discussions presented by a stellar collection of New York City educators and mental health providers.

EARLY REGISTRATION INCLUDES DISCOUNTED TICKETS
FOR STUDENTS, PROFESSIONALS, AND COMMUNITY MEMBERS.
LIVE STREAMING IS ALSO AVAILABLE FOR REMOTE ATTENDEES!

Speakers and Session Schedule:

8:15AM — Welcome Address

8:30AM — Keynote Address by Margaret Nichols, PhD
“Kink is Good: BDSM in the Context of New Models of Sex and Gender Variance”

10:05AM — Zhana Vrangalova, PhD
“Myths and Realities of Consensual Non-Monogamy”

11:05AM — Dulcinea Pitagora, MA, LMSW and Michael Aaron, PhD
“The Kink-Poly Confluence: Community Intersections and Clinical Approaches”

12:05PM — Lunch Break

1:20PM — Michael Aaron, PhD
“Facing Your Shadow: The Healing Potential of Psychological Edge Play” 

2:20PM — Rosalyn Dischiavo, PhD
“Metamorphosis: Braving Transitions in Polyamorous Relationships” 

3:30PM — David Ortmann, LCSW
“Age Play: Eros, Practicality, and Walking the Edge”

4:30PM — Panel Discussion & Final Words (optional)

 

produced by
Michael Aaron, PhD and Dulcinea Pitagora, MA, LMSW

A portion of the AltSex NYC Conference proceeds will be donated to the Community-Academic Consortium for Research on Alternative Sexualities (CARAS) in appreciation of their continued dedication to supporting and promoting excellence in the study of alternative sexualities.

*The AltSexNYC Conference is currently being reviewed by AASECT as an approved provider of continuing education for certified sex therapists, and the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers.

For more information or to register for the conference, visit AltSexNYCconference.org.

NOTE: The content of this blog is owned by Dulcinea Pitagora. See Terms and Conditions for republishing restrictions/allowances.

Resources for Sexuality and Gender Warriors

Disclosure: I have a morning coffee and reading ritual, and this morning I realized I hadn’t yet followed Dr. Meg John Barker’s blog Rewriting the Rules—now corrected!  Dr. Barker’s latest blog post Beyond the Binary is inspiring in its eloquence and clarity around the important influence that “sexuality and gender warriors” have on questioning “static thinking about sexuality.” Give it a read! I was also inspired to add Dr. Barker’s book Rewriting the Rules to my library:

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Rewriting the Rules is a friendly guide through the complicated—and often contradictory—
rules of love: the advice that is given about attraction and sex,
monogamy and conflict, gender and commitment.”

Dr. Barker’s blog also offers a multitude of resources on sexuality and gender diversity. One in particular that I wanted to share is the link to Clarisse Thorn’s BDSM Resources, which led to another blog subscription as well as a few new additions to my library, including:

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A Parent’s Guide to Alternative Sexualities: “There’s More!”

by Amy Marsh

“A progressive, introductory handbook for parents who have teenagers and young adults
who are expressing an interest in alternative sexualities such as BDSM and polyamory.
Practical, supportive information written by a clinical sexologist.”

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The S&M Feminist: Best of Clarisse Thorn

“Clarisse Thorn’s writing has appeared across the Internet in places like
The Guardian, AlterNet, Feministe, Jezebel, Time Out, The Rumpus, Ms., and
The Good Men Project. This is a selection of her best articles, all in one place!”

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Playing Well with Others

Playing Well with Others:
Your Field Guide to Discovering, Navigating and Exploring
the Kink, Leather, and BDSM Communities

by Lee Harrington

“While there are plenty of other books out there that explain how to give a spanking
or tie a half-hitch, Playing Well with Others is the first book that explains kink *culture*—the munches,
parties, leather bars, conferences, workshops, fetish nights, exploratoriums and all the other gatherings
of kinksters that turn BDSM and leather from a bedroom predeliction to a lifestyle and a community.”

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Playing on the Edge

Playing on the Edge: Sadomasochism, Risk, and Intimacy

by Staci Newmahr

“In this pathbreaking book, ethnographer Staci Newmahr delves into the social space of a
public, pansexual SM community to understand sadomasochism from the inside out.
Based on four years of in-depth and immersive participant observation, she juxtaposes
her experiences in the field with the life stories of community members, providing a richly detailed
portrait of SM as a social space in which experiences of “violence” intersect with experiences of the erotic.”

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Thorne’s complete list is well worth checking out, and goes beyond books to include films, other online resources, and information about how to find in person events near you. If you have favorite resources you feel like sharing, please post them in the comments below!

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Sliding Scale Appointments Now Available!

I have the pleasure of announcing that beginning this summer I will be working under the supervision of Dr. Kelly Wise, psychotherapist and AASECT certified sex therapist. I’ll be taking on a limited number of sliding scale appointments at his Union Square office, working with individuals, couples, non-traditional relationships and families, and current or former sex workers dealing with issues across the spectrum of gender identification/expression, sexual orientation/expression, D/s dynamics, relationship status, intersections thereof, and beyond. Please contact me directly via email or my contact page for more information, or call me at 917-675-3446 for a free 15-minute phone consultation. I will continue working at PCGS and my private practice as well, and if for some reason we won’t be able to work together, I recommend taking a look at ManhattanAlternative.com, a referral listing for alternative lifestyle affirmative providers.

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IDAHOT: May 17!

From APAGS GradPsychBlog:

“On May 17, 1990, the World Health Organization declassified homosexuality as a mental disorder, and since 2005 the International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia, and Biphobia (IDAHOT) has commemorated that day. It is a global occasion for individuals, groups, and organizations to take action on topics related to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals and to advocate for more accepting public policies. Each year a global focus for IDAHOT is chosen and this year’s is LGBT youth.”

idahot

Read more!

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Cross-post: Thinking Globally about Sex and Gender

A couple of years ago I discovered a document called the Yogyakarta Principles on the Application of International Human Rights Law in relation to Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity, created in 2006 in Yogyakarta, Indonesia by the International Commission of Jurists and the International Service for Human Rights, on behalf of a coalition of human rights organizations in reaction to egregious international human rights violations pertaining to individuals marginalized for their sexual orientation and/or gender identifications.

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The introduction to the Yogyakarta Principles begins with…

“All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. all human rights are universal, interdependent, indivisible and interrelated. sexual orientation1) and gender identity2) are integral to every person’s dignity and humanity and must not be the basis for discrimination or abuse” (p. 6).

…and ends with…

“The Yogyakarta Principles affirm binding international legal standards with which all states must comply. they promise a different future where all people born free and equal in dignity and rights can fulfill that precious birthright” (p. 7).

I’m an advocate for every clinician and educator’s (and every human, really) reading this document in its entirety, which is why I decided to post this on the ManhattanAlternative.com blog, and is why I’m cross-posting it here as well. Though the abridged principles listed as follows can be interpreted differently depending on context and experience, thinking critically about them as they stand here is a useful exercise in itself:

  1. The right to the universal enjoyment of human rights.
  2. The rights to equality and non-discrimination.
  3. The right to recognition before the law.
  4. The right to life.
  5. The right to security of the person.
  6. The right to privacy.
  7. The right to freedom of arbitrary deprivation of liberty.
  8. The right to a fair trial.
  9. The right to treatment with humanity while in detention.
  10. The right to freedom from torture and cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.
  11. The right to protection from all forms of exploitation, sale and trafficking of human beings.
  12. The right to work.
  13. The right to social security and to other social protection measures.
  14. The right to an adequate standard of living.
  15. The right to adequate housing.
  16. The right to education.
  17. The right to the highest attainable standard of health.
  18. Protection from medical abuses.
  19. The right to freedom of opinion and expression.
  20. The right to freedom of peaceful assembly and association.
  21. The right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion.
  22. The right to freedom of movement.
  23. The right to seek asylum.
  24. The right to found a family.
  25. The right to participate in public life.
  26. The right to participate in cultural life.
  27. The right to promote human rights.
  28. The right to effective remedies and redress.
  29. Accountability.

Some interesting questions to ponder:

Which of the above principles most affect you on a regular basis?

Which have you fought for in terms of your personal experience?

Which might you have taken for granted?

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Kinkademia

Today feels like a good day to pay homage to a book that is the best collection of academic research and community-based literature on BDSM that I’ve read: Safe, Sane and Consensual: Contemporary Perspectives on Sadomasochism, edited by Dr. Darren Langdridge and Dr. Meg Barker (2008). The following excerpts have acted as a source of motivation for my own academic research into the psychological and interpersonal landscapes of BDSM.  These quotes are all from Part I: Introducing Sadomasochism, and I highly recommend reading the text in context, as well as all of the parts that follow—Theorising Pain and InjuryEmpirical ResearchTherapeutic Pespectives, and Bridging the Academic/Activist Divide.

“Most of the stories which reach beyond communities to the outside world are watered down, ‘mainstreamed,’ and deeply de-sexualised—often focused on an SM aesthetic rather than anyone involved in SM would identify as something they do” (Situating Sadomasochism, Darren Langdridge and Meg Barker, p. 4).

“Consent is a particularly problematic concept, that has been troubled in an important way by feminist scholarship” (Situating Sadomasochism, Darren Langdridge and Meg Barker, p. 4).

“The voice of the radical feminist drowns out the voice of the woman SMer” (Situating Sadomasochism, Darren Langdridge and Meg Barker, p. 5).

“The overwhelming whiteness of writing on SM is something that deeply troubles us. [There is] a lack of writing on race, ethnicity, trans, disability…” (Situating Sadomasochism, Darren Langdridge and Meg Barker, p. 6).

“This paper defines S/M as a broad range of consensual, erotic, interpersonal interactions involving the administration and reception of pain and/or the enactment of dominant and submissive power dynamics. Historical evidence suggests that behaviours imitative of those we contemporarily identify as S/M have occurred for millennia” (The Cultural Formation of S/M: History and Analysis, Kathy Sisson, p. 12).

“Up until the 1940s, no clear distinction between sexual orientation and S/M practice appears in the literature. A distinct gay male leather community developed in the USA in the 1940s…distinct heterosexual and lesbian S/M communities emerged in the 1970s. Due in large part to the viturperous feminist sex wars during the second wave of feminism, a considerable literature on lesbian S/M communities exists as well. I suggest that these three distinct S/M communities, gay, lesbian and heterosexual, co-exist today as part of the larger S/M sexual culture. However, a paucity of data exists regarding the development and characteristics of heterosexual S/M communities and culture” (The Cultural Formation of S/M: History and Analysis, Kathy Sisson, p. 13).

“Psychopathia Sexualis (1886) also popularized the binary sexual identity schema based on gender or sex of object choice – homosexual or heterosexual” (The Cultural Formation of S/M: History and Analysis, Kathy Sisson, p. 15).

“Gosselin, Wilson and Barrett administered the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire to 57 S/M-identified women and found that, although the women showed ‘high psychoticism, low neuroticism and high libido traditionally associated with a stereotypic “male” image…this is not to say that the behavior of S/M women should be regarded as pathological…’” (The Cultural Formation of S/M: History and Analysis, Kathy Sisson, p. 24).

“Echoing the removal of homosexuality from the DSM in 1973, researchers, clinicians and activists are beginning to challenge the DSM diagnosis of sadism and masochism” (The Cultural Formation of S/M: History and Analysis, Kathy Sisson, p. 25).

“Masochistic interactions would provide ‘a temporary and powerful escape from high-level awareness of self as an abstract, temporally extended, symbolically constructed identity, to a low-level, temporally constricted awareness of self as physical body, focusing on immediate sensations (both painful and pleasant) and on being a sexual object.’ By temporarily adopting a masochistic identity, individuals could escape the ‘burden of selfhood’ and achieve respite from the demands of modern society.” (The Cultural Formation of S/M: History and Analysis, Kathy Sisson, p. 27).

“Weinberg (1994) suggests six prerequisite social criteria for the institutionalization of S/M interests into S/M culture: embedded power relations, social acceptance of aggression, unequal power distribution, leisure time, imagination and creativity.” (The Cultural Formation of S/M: History and Analysis, Kathy Sisson, p. 27).

“McClintock (1993) suggests S/M is uniquely well-suited sexually for post-modern, post-procreative society because it flaunts socially constructed power, gender roles, identity and eroticism [and] proposes several ways in which S/M accomplishes this: (1) S/M subverts reified social power relations by creativing and enacting exaggerated power roles and by appropriating the privelege to punish; (2) S/M challenges the boundaries of sanctioned gender role behavior by allowing either gender to assume dominant and submissive roles; (3) S/M mocks the concept of a unitary, fixed identity by allowing participants to move fluidly in and out of an S/M sexual identity and by facilitating participants’ adoption of various fantasy and S/M roles; and (4) S/M deconstructs the paradigm of genitally oriented eroticism by utilizing non-genital, non-erogenous sites on the body for sexual arousal” (The Cultural Formation of S/M: History and Analysis, Kathy Sisson, p. 28).

“BDSM is a term used to describe a variety of sexual behaviours that have an implicit or explicit power differential as a significant aspect of the erotic interaction” (Themes of SM Expression, Charles Moser and Peggy J. Kleinplatz, p. 35).

“The subjective aspects of SM require their own taxonomy. Motives and intentions are complex and cannot ever be deduced from observation alone” (Themes of SM Expression, Charles Moser and Peggy J. Kleinplatz, p. 37).

“SM is said to have five common features: the appearance of dominance and submission, role-playing, mutual definition, consensuality and a sexual context for the individual… The emphasis here is on the appearance of dominance and submission, because the actual power in the relationship is much more subtle… SM is consensual by definition. Just as the difference between consensual coitus and rape is consent, the difference between SM and violence is consent. Non-consensual acts are criminal” (Themes of SM Expression, Charles Moser and Peggy J. Kleinplatz, p. 38).

“For others, the role-play provides the context for the SM and, sometimes, even for the relationship itself. That is, they find the roles create the erotic backdrop for the relationship; without these roles the partner would cease to be attractive” (Themes of SM Expression, Charles Moser and Peggy J. Kleinplatz, p. 42).

“Of interest, the ‘Mommy-boy’ dynamic is less common and often cast as an ‘adult-baby’ relationship… Even though these terms denote the gender of the participants, one cannot infer the sex of the participants from this language; lesbians often employ the ‘male’ terms and some men use the ‘female’ terms” (Themes of SM Expression, Charles Moser and Peggy J. Kleinplatz, p. 43).

“It is well known that sexual arousal alters pain perception, elevating pain thresholds over 80%…” (Themes of SM Expression, Charles Moser and Peggy J. Kleinplatz, p. 45).

“…a fetish is distinct from partialism; the latter involves a strong sexual attraction towards a part of the body. Within the SM community, both possibilities are merged together and referred to as a fetish” (Themes of SM Expression, Charles Moser and Peggy J. Kleinplatz, p. 49).

“One of the difficulties in designating any set of proclivities as pathological is the lack of criteria for what constitutes ‘normal’ or ‘healthy’ sexuality… The lack of objective criteria makes it all too easy for mental health professionals to rely upon predominant cultural values to guide assessments… At present, Western clinicians tend to think of ‘normal’ sexuality as monogamous, procreation-oriented intercourse, featuring the heterosexual, young (but not too young) and able-bodied” (Is SM Pathological?, Peggy J. Kleinplatz and Charles Moser, p. 55).

“…when distress is manifest, it may result primarily from social stigma surrounding SM. This phenomenon is akin to internalized homonegativity in gay and lesbian individuals. The recommended ‘treatment’ is to validate the distress rather than to ‘cure’ the SM desires… As for impairment, this [DSM] criterion is particularly noteworthy in illustrating the social biases that continue to pervade the DSM. For example, the DSM considers it a sign of impairment if SM is ‘obligatory’; why single out some behaviours as pathological when required for sexual fulfillment and not others? Why not decree that people who require heterosexual intercourse to reach orgasm are pathological? Actually that was precisely the case during the 1950s when women who ‘failed’ to achieve orgasm during intercourse were labeled ‘frigid’” (Is SM Pathological?, Peggy J. Kleinplatz and Charles Moser, p. 57).

“In the absence of theory or research demonstrating what constitutes ‘normal’ sexuality, it is all too easy to pathologize the unconventional based on prevailing social currents. SM is particularly liable to being stigmatized in societies uneasy with sexual pleasure for its own sake” (Is SM Pathological?, Peggy J. Kleinplatz and Charles Moser, p. 60).

“The reason for, and essence of, the question [whether law can ever make peace with violence] is the fundamental paradox that while law purports to substitute itself for violence – in the form of a civilized, and civilizing, alternative – it retains and depends on, an immanent violence of its own” (Sadomasochism and the Law, Matthew Weait, p. 63).

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Learning the Language of Grief

This week I was asked to facilitate a suicide bereavement group in collaboration with Persist Health Project to support those who had recently lost someone important to them.  This person also happened to be a leader in their community, and someone who had offered support and strength to many beyond their immediate circle of loved ones.  We sat together that morning in an effort to learn and teach each other the language of grief.

Please note, the following does not represent mine or any one else’s voice in particular, and is not meant to be a distillation or summation of all voices present, but represents a few of the ideas and feelings that were shared as our thoughts and emotions intersected and diverged.

We sat facing each other and talked about our emotions, the emotions of those who knew the person well and had seen them recently, and the emotions of those who had only met them once or twice but had been affected deeply by their fierce activism. Collectively, we were sad, shocked, confused, angry, numb, hurt, speechless, frustrated, anguished, heavy, isolated, overwhelmed, afraid, hopeless, guilty. We also felt love for the person who is now gone, and for others in our respective and intersecting communities. We also felt hate for the forces in the world that make life so difficult to live at times, and for the internal forces that can exist within individuals that sometimes lead towards destruction. We wondered what it means to die, to kill yourself, to exist after someone you care about kills themselves, what anything means, whether anything really has meaning, how meaning changes, how emotions change, how things can get better, then worse, then better, how nothing stays the same. We talked about wanting to take care of each other, and to take care of ourselves, and not always knowing how to do either. We talked about how sometimes taking care of yourself is a way to take care of someone else important to you, and asking for help for yourself is a way to help your community. We asked a lot of questions, and the most concrete answer was that there is sometimes no answer, because sometimes the answer is in the asking.

We talked about the different ways we react at different times to different people after something like this happens. We talked about the importance of self-expression, about fighting the good fight, about listening to music, about engaging all senses, about communication, about sex, about feeding yourself, about simply existing, about just being there, about sitting in uncomfortable silence, about trying, about letting go of meaning making, about asking for help.

It’s hard to talk about death and about grief because it’s not something we’re ever really taught to do in Western culture, so it’s like learning a new language. In the silence that comes with not knowing what to say or how to feel about things like suicide or grieving, there can be loneliness and isolation, and even those who seem to be the most prosocial and surrounded by support can be lonely and isolated and not seem like they are at all.

An experience like the one I describe above can never be encapsulated or distilled down in a way that accurately represents each individual’s perspective, but I will leave you with some thoughts that I feel are useful to contemplate.  Self-care can be as simple as becoming aware of one’s internal processes and emotions, even if that awareness is that there is a certain lack of awareness or ability to be aware.  Learning how to communicate transparently and empathetically with others is a work in progress that is not always easy, and can be clouded by grief.  Engaging with and strengthening our respective and intersecting communities can be active ways to support those we care about while strengthening our own support systems.

Finally, if I were to voice a take home message, it would be this: We sat facing each other.  It wasn’t about the sitting, or the direction we were sitting, but we shared space.  People came out to share space together, to take care of each other, to take care of themselves.

I will be offering free therapy sessions at the Persist Health Project office to those in mourning in the wake of this tragedy on Monday afternoons through April. Contact me directly through email or call 917-675-3446.

Some additional resources:

Parachute NYC provides alternatives to hospitalization for people experiencing emotional crises.

The Support Line is a free and confidential phone service operated by peer staff that offers support and referral services to NYC individuals experiencing emotional distress: 646-741-HOPE.

1-800-LIFENET is a free, confidential, multi-lingual, mental health and substance abuse information, referral, and crisis prevention hotline available to anyone at any time.

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline—by calling 1-800-273-TALK (8255) you’ll be connected to a skilled, trained counselor at a crisis center in your area, anytime 24/7.

The Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention is a public-private partnership advancing the Surgeon General’s National Strategy for Suicide Prevention.

The Trevor Project is the leading national organization providing crisis intervention and suicide prevention services to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) young people ages 13-24.

Persist Health Project is a peer-led, community-based health and community organizing project based on Brooklyn, New York that provides health referrals, health education, mental health services, herbal health services, peer support, job training, and leadership development for communities involved with and/or impacted by the sex trade.

ManhattanAlternative.com is a network of therapeutic service providers in New York City who are sex-positive, affirmative, and have expertise related to issues that kink, poly, consensually non-monogamous, trans, gender non-conforming, and/or LGBQ-identified individuals face.

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